Politics

Second Day of School for the Little Rock Nine

09/26/2017
Updated
09/26/2017

The decision handed down in 1954 by the U.S. Supreme Court in the Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka case put an end to the idea of "separate but equal" in the U.S. and effectively ruled that segregation on the basis of race was unconstitutional. It was no longer permissible for public institutions to have separate bathrooms for black people and white people, separate offices for black people and white people, or more to the point of this article, separate schools for black people and white people. For 58 years following the 1896 Supreme Court decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, this type of enforced segregation was the law of the land. It didn't stop there, in many parts of America, it was against the law during to NOT segregate certain facilities.

U.S. Presidents Who Won Their Elections but Finished Second in the Popular Vote

01/20/2017

As most of us all know, in American politics, it’s the electoral college and not the popular vote that determines the winner in a presidential election. This odd fact of government has long been a burr in the butt of those who’ve found themselves losing end of an electoral vote despite having the majority of voters behind them. So honor of, and I can't believe I'm actually writing this, "The Donald’s" swearing in as 45th president of the U.S. today, it seems a good time to highlight some previous elections where, like the most recent, the winner finished second place in the popular vote.